June 3, 2015

the year in books :: June 2015

YIBJune

My May read, Matt Haig’s Reasons to Stay Alive was unlike anything I’d read before. Haig’s memoir about his experiences of depression, it is written in short, punchy chapters, which alternate between autobiographical narrative and musings on the nature of depression. Candid, wise, heartfelt, sad, and yet also extremely funny, it is a truly unique and brilliant book. It taught me a good deal about depression, and even more about life, bringing to mind the famous quotation from Mary Oliver: ‘Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?’, ‘

My June read, Elizabeth is Missing, the debut novel of Emma Healey, has come highly recommended by all who have read it. I am looking forward to settling down with a cup of tea and turning the first page.

Once again, this month’s #theyearinbooks Twitter chat was a fun and friendly hour of bookish chat, with lots of lovely new participants. Thanks so much to everyone who took part. The June chat will be, as usual, on the last Monday of the month (29th) . Do come along and join us if Twitter’s your thing; we’re a very welcoming crowd, and you’re sure to come away with a to-read list as long as your arm, and some bookish new friends to boot. (I’m @circleofpines on Twitter.) If you’d like me to tweet you a reminder nearer the time, give me a shout and I’ll add you to the list.

If you’re joining in with #theyearinbooks over on Instagram, you should now be able to add your Instagram posts to the linkup below by following these instructions.

You can find Year in Books blog buttons, and all the details about the project on the YIB information page. Here’s a quick reminder of how it works:

The aim of the Year in Books project is to read (at least) a book a month during 2015. It’s not a conventional book club, so we don’t all read the same book, the project is about trying to ensure that we make space for reading in our busy lives, and is a way for us all to discover more lovely books (and lovely bibliophiles). At the start of the month, we blog about the book that we are intending to read, and, if we want to, write a few words (thoughts, comments, a review of sorts) about the previous month’s book.

If you would prefer to share your book choices over on Instagram or Twitter, please use the hashtag #theyearinbooks so that we can find your posts. You can share as many books as you like in this way- it doesn’t have to be restricted to one a month. I am @circleofpines on Instagram and on Twitter, if you’d like to tag me so that I can see your posts.

There’s a Goodreads group for this project, and all are very welcome to join, whether or not you have a blog of your own. Finally, there’s a Year in Books Pinterest board, do follow along for all manner of bookish inspiration. If you would like to pin to the board, let me know in the blog comments and I will add you as a pinner. (If I should have added you, and haven’t, do nudge me! Pinterest is a little problematic on the issue and it sometimes takes a couple of attempts.)

It doesn’t matter whether or not you have linked up before- everyone is welcome and it’s never too late to get involved. Please do link back here from your post.

Thank you, and happy reading!

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8 thoughts on “the year in books :: June 2015

  1. EmmA

    I LOVED Elizabeth is Missing! It was by far the best book I’ve read this year. But I talked about it in my last “the year in books” review. Thanks again for organizing this and for the great idea. In fact I found out about that book in one of “the year in books” post from a link under your post! 🙂

    Reply
  2. Gina

    I also enjoyed Elizabeth is Missing. Very original and it made me think very differently about Alzheimers and memory loss. I hope you enjoy it.

    Reply
  3. Christina

    Thank you Laura for organising the link-up (again). I listened to the audio version of ‘Elizabeth is missing’. It was narrated beautifully and Maude really came to live. Enjoy the book! x

    Reply
  4. Eileen

    I enjoyed Elizabeth is Missing. I thought it was a very clever approach to use a person suffering from Alzheimer to narrate the story. Hope you enjoy it too.

    Reply

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